K.R.Pushpam Complex, Aarthi Theatre Road, Dindigul, 624001
Dindigul Lock

Dindigul Lock

The manufacturing industry of Lock in Dindigul is more than 500 years old and spread over district locations. They can guarantee aspects such as efficiency, complete safety, and key facilities, which are most importantly attractive and special in nature.

Mango lock, Door Lock, Trick Lock, Bell Lock, Drawer Lock, Shutter Lock & Book Shutter Lock are the common types of locks developed in Dindigul. Dindigul Locks have been purchased especially for Temples. Because of its foolproof protection, government organization, and company locations.

Dindigul Lock
Dindigul Lock

To know more, please click the below link…

https://renghaholidays.com/

Dindigul lock manufacturers say that their locks’ precision lever mechanism is manually assembled with specific key code and shackles are meticulous in construction that gives anyone who tries to break in greater resistance. Although the Indian market has plenty of locks, people offer first preference to reputed traditional Dindigul locks.

The Locks History

Dindigul Lock Throughout the century, the basic key-and-pin theory has continued. It spread from Egypt to Greece and finally to the Roman Empire, where smaller locks which could secure chests and drawers were further adapted. Apparently, wealthy Romans would wear their keys like rings so that other Patricians would realize that they were rich enough to own items that required protection.

Archaeologists found the earliest known locking mechanisms at the Palace of Khorsabad in modern-day Iraq in the mid-19th century. The primitive key and lock arrangement dates back to 4000 B.C. when the region was the kingdom of Assyria in Mesopotamia. The wooden style is surprisingly similar, or at least the basic concept is the same, to modern-day locks.

The Dindigul Lock is known for its superior quality and durability worldwide, while the cotton saree is distinguished by broad contrast borders.

The Geographical Indication (GI) tag was issued by the Geographical Indications Registry in Chennai to two well-known products from Tamil Nadu: Dindigul lock and Kandangi saree.

Dindigul Lock
Dindigul Lock

To know more, please click the below link…

https://renghaholidays.com/

The Dindigul Bolt, Hardware, and Steel Furniture Workers Industrial Co-operative Society Limited made the request for the bolt. An application was filed for the Kandangi saree by Amarar Rajeev Gandhi Handloom Weavers Co-operative Development and Sales Society Limited.

Today, “Chinnaraja G. Naidu, Deputy Registrar of Geographical Indications, told The Hindu on Thursday morning,” Dindigul lock and Kandangi saree were registered. The GI was filed by the Chennai-based IPR Attorney and GI Advocate Sanjai Gandhi for both goods.

The Dindigul locks are known throughout the world for their superior quality and durability, so much so that even the city is called Lock City. Government institutions such as prisons, godowns, hospitals, and even temples use these locks instead of other machine-made ones.

In and around Dindigul Lock, more than 3,125 lock manufacturing units are restricted to an area of 5 km. Nagelnagar, Nallampatti, Kodaiparailpatti, Kamalapatti, and Yagappanpatti are concentrated in these areas. This region’s abundance of iron is the reason for the industry’s growth. There are over 50 types of locks made by artisans using raw materials from nearby cities, including Madurai and Salem, such as MS flat plates and brass plates.

In the entire Karaikudi taluk in Sivaganga district, the Kandangi sarees are manufactured. They are distinguished by broad contrasting borders and some are considered to have borders that cover up to two-thirds of the saree, which is typically around 5.10 m-5.60 m in length. Worn in summer, these cotton sarees are commonly purchased in bulk by customers.

“This is the lock for the bell,” he says. “It will take two weeks for a professional locksmith in these sections to craft this by hand.”

This 42-year-old lock maker and retailer, surrounded by a sea of shimmering silver and brass, has spent his life and career in Dindigul, a city of two million people in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu. His family has been part of, and privy to, the secrets of an ancient lock-making company for the past 75 years.

Dindigul locks received a GI (Geographical Indication) tag last August, given to distinctive and authentic Indian indigenous products that can be traced to a particular geographical region and are renowned for their quality.

In the case of Dindigul Lock, geography has always been the answer. “People turned to make locks [here] because in this area there was an abundance of iron, but the water was scarce for agriculture,” says Pradeep Kumar.

But times are transforming. Until the 1980s, in Dindigul, perhaps 1,800 locksmiths lived and worked. Just about 200 practitioners today know how to make a traditional Dindigul door lock, often referred to as a bullet lock. With nine inner levers working five cylindrical steel rods simultaneously, it is a complicated metal contraption; with every twist of the key, the rods latch into place.

Although there is still demand for these locks, temples, houses, and government offices in Tamil Nadu still use them, for example, production has not been able to keep up, due to a shortage of skilled labor in large part. Ingenuity has also suffered. Over a hundred varieties of locks were developed by the city at one time. Maybe 50 variants exist today, of which only 10 are in active development. The intricate knowledge that sustained a town has faded in just three generations, says Kumar.

Ragu operates a small hardware store named Ragu Hardware on Dindigul’s vibrant market street, tucked into a narrow lane. There was a time, he says, when only Dindigul’s locks were stocked. But competition from cheaper, machine-made locks, manufactured in China and the northern Indian city of Aligarh, has adjusted the equation in an age of electronic surveillance and high-tech security systems.

However, one variety of lock has retained its popularity here: the Maanga Poottu, or a lock of mango. Its popularity depends on its toughness, resembling an ordinary padlock formed in the form of the mango, a beloved fruit in these sections. It can be used to protect houses, drawers, safes, cupboards, and bicycles. Made in all sizes.

Each mango lock is designed to be opened with what is known locally as a “female key.” When the key is inserted into the padlock, which has a circular hollow opening at its top, the hole latches onto a rod in the internal mechanism of the lock.

Pradeep Kumar describes a Chennai customer who recently ordered a “Nithra” lock, a mango padlock that has two side-by-side keyholes designed specifically to confuse a thief. The lock jams if the key is inserted into the wrong hole. The customer wished that two iron plates that slipped over the keyholes would obscure his Nithra bolt.

There is an iron rod in some mango locks that stretches from the keyhole. The lock can only be opened if the rod is set at a certain angle; a secret known only to the locksmith and the person who commissions it is the design of the tilt. “It is a variant of a combination of numbers,” Pradeep Kumar says.

Then there is the lock of the mango button, which opens only when after pressing a hidden button you twist the key. There are also padlocks that involve the opening of two keys of varying sizes. The second key is larger and only works if the smaller key stays inserted into the lock.

Dindigul Lock
Dindigul Lock

To know more, please click the below link…

https://renghaholidays.com/

In the history of Dindigul, the mango locks of ‘Vichitra’ are among the most interesting. These locks were crafted with a family company’s inherent hierarchy in mind at a time when such companies were the law and flourished in an age when cash registers were never mechanized.

For each Vichitra lock, three keys exist one for the cashier, one for the manager, and the third for the owner of the business. He would put his key in the lock, twist it once to the right, then twist it left to lock the cash register if the supervisor thought the cashier was stealing from the store. After that, the cashier’s key will not work anymore. He might do the same thing with his card if both the cashier and the supervisor wanted to be locked out by the owner.

Tipu Sultan, the 18th-century ruler of the Kingdom of Mysore in southern India, is said to have commissioned the first Dindigul lock to guard a fort on the summit of a steep hill in the heart of the city. But according to British documents, according to N., The Dindigul lock industry did not really come to life until the 1900s. Rajendran, head of the history department at Bharathidasan University in Tiruchirappalli.

Dindigul Lock probable that lock makers from Dindigul were an indigenous artisan culture,” he says. It’s amazing how they managed to brand their craft, creating their special word of mouth brand appeal. This has contributed to a flourishing demand for these items in southern India.

Five villages around Dindigul were once a sanctuary for locksmiths, but their numbers have diminished, just like the retailers. Pradeep Kumar speaks fondly of a professional craftsman with whom he had worked for many years: Kothambari Pitchai, who died at the age of 85 three months ago, after a lifetime of locksmithing. “Kumar says,” There was no lock that was too complicated, that he could not devise. “His death, for me, marked the end of an era.”

On a blazing hot January afternoon, four elderly locksmiths are working hard in a shop packed with rustic tables and equipment, quaint machinery, and heaps of iron, brass, and steel at the government-run Dindigul Lock, Hardware and Steel Furniture Workers’ Industrial Cooperative Society (DICO). Three to five locks a day are made by each of these master craftsmen, for which they receive around 350 rupees (or $5).

The GI recognition provided both joy and affirmation for K. Venkatachalam, the 58-year-old president of the local locksmiths’ union who has 36 years of lock-making experience. “At the age of seven, from my father and grandparents, I learned this ancient art,” he says. “It makes me proud to believe that people have a deeper understanding of what we do and greater respect for it.”

“The [Dindigul] sector thrived because while designing new designs, lock-makers were able to take bold risks,” Karuppanah says.

But some projects, he admits, were too daring, perhaps. For instance, the famed Kolaikaran Pootu, aka the lock of the murderer. Legend has it that it was planned to assassinate a possible assassin. A slim knife would pop out from a secret slit and gouge out his eyes if a would-be murderer used the wrong key or tried to pick the lock. These locks have been illegal now, and they have not been used since the 1970s.

Today, other industries in Dindigul are thriving: tanneries, textiles, tobacco cultivation. The secrets of the city’s ancient industry could be sealed away in the past unless a new generation of locksmithing artisans steps up.

To know more, please click the below link…

https://renghaholidays.com/

Category: Blog